In the second week of this season’s In Treatment, I remain ambivalent. I like all of the actors and do not especially like any of the characters. I struggle to understand why Brooke, who describes herself as some variety of longer term probably psychodynamic therapist is seeing these patients. 

Eladio is a good candidate for depth therapy *if* it weren’t dependent on his employer paying. He would be a tough one to work with because of his history with probably drug use and shakiness of his life circumstances, but he seems psychologically minded, can reflect on himself and is so very eager to attach to Brooke. But his employer is looking for a resolution to Eladio’s insomnia, not for his personal growth so the resources for long term work are not likely there. I understand the appeal of working with Eladio and how Brooke is somewhat seduced by him, so she is going to have to keep an eye on her countertransference with him and be ready for him to leave well before he is actually ready.

Why Colin? Referred by the court — which is already an issue because Brooke is being hired for reporting on her assessment of him, not by him for therapy. In my experience these kinds of referrals rarely go anywhere past what is ordered, because the patient is not the initiator of the referral or the work. So she has accepted him and as a pro bono patient too — why? And why is the court not paying for the four sessions which it has ordered? So I am puzzled by the fact that Brooke accepted the referral. The verbal fencing he does with Brooke and the avoidance of anything resembling real  insight would wear thin pretty quickly. That he is there to get an approving report from Brooke feels to me like the only real skin he has in the game and the major reason he is there at all. The fact that he has crashed and burned his life could be the impetus for real work in therapy, but only if he is willing to drop the mask and be vulnerable. 

Then we have Laila.It is never clear that much if anything Laila talks about is really personal. Her character is drawn more as a type than as a person. The one place where I could feel her was when she talked about the way she and her girlfriend created imaginary worlds together. There was a playfulness and creativity in what she described that is very different from the brittle intellectualizing she more usually indulges in. We see in her talk about her relationship with her girlfriend a look into who Laila is underneath the mask she wears. She tells Brooke a dream, which Brooke deals with entirely as about the reality of being a black woman, which certainly is part of it. But she makes no attempt to bring the dream back to Laila and what is says about her life today. The Jungian in me wishes she had invited Laila to actually work on the dream with her as that very well might have opened this therapy up a lot more. As with the other two patients, there is every reason to feel the work with them will be short term. Laila is going off to college for one thing and her grandmother brings her to Brooke to prepare her for college. These patients seem misaligned with what Brooke purports her practice to be. 

We learn in Monday’s segment about Brooke, that Paul, from previous seasons, is Brooke’s supervisor. Rita says she thought Brooke talked with him every week. We have seen Brooke dodge his calls and emails so we know Rita is right when she asks if Brooke is avoiding him. That she is doing so is a big red flag given Brooke’s issues. It is clear that Brooke has some issues with Paul in fact, referring to him as the “world renowned Paul Weston” out of anger maybe or envy. In the process of her talking with Rita, we learn that she has thought about having a baby with Adam. We know from earlier that at age 15, she had a baby which her parents made her surrender for adoption. And now she wants to find her son.  So we have Eladio wanting a mother and Laila without a mother and Brooke struggling with the loss of her father and longing to find her son — a potent stew indeed. I was intrigued that Rita sat in one of the chairs and Brooke on the couch, reflecting perhaps the way she and Brooke are relating, more as therapist and patient than as friends.

As I said before, I like the actors this season but find the characters they are playing kind of lacking. The three patients seem like types rather than full fleshed people. They embody an issue or group — Black American teens or privileged white men or essential workers who aren’t treated that way — more than they stand out as unique individuals in need of help. Plus we haven’t heard at all how the changes wrought by COVID has impacted them, which seems quite unrealistic. In my practice my patients regularly talk about issues and feelings they have arising from the pandemic so how can it be that this is not a major element in this season?

What are your thoughts? What do you like? Dislike?  Let’s talk about it in the comments.

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1 Comment

  1. Mostly, I find myself missing Paul. Brooke’s character is interesting in a kind of slow motion train wreck that I can’t stop watching sort of way. She is a therapist who is drinking a lot to dull her own pain and sleeping with Adam who she knows is bad for her, even if she denies that he is bad for her to Rita. (Rita seems to be more like Brooke’s AA sponsor than just a friend. She know’s Brooke’s history and she can call out her bs). Brooke could use a therapist. Will she ever stop avoiding her supervising therapist, Paul ? Her character has an attitude that seems like a bit of stereotyping- younger Black woman resents older, White man in a position of authority. Can she gets past that?


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